Signatures neuronales du sommeil chez le poisson zèb

Signatures neuronales du sommeil chez le poisson zèb

août 6, 2019 0 Par admin

Translating…

Abstract

Slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement (or paradoxical) sleep have been found in mammals, birds and lizards, but it is unclear whether these neuronal signatures are found in non-amniotic vertebrates. Here we develop non-invasive fluorescence-based polysomnography for zebrafish, and show—using unbiased, brain-wide activity recording coupled with assessment of eye movement, muscle dynamics and heart rate—that there are at least two major sleep signatures in zebrafish. These signatures, which we term slow bursting sleep and propagating wave sleep, share commonalities with those of slow-wave sleep and paradoxical or rapid eye movement sleep, respectively. Further, we find that melanin-concentrating hormone signalling (which is involved in mammalian sleep) also regulates propagating wave sleep signatures and the overall amount of sleep in zebrafish, probably via activation of ependymal cells. These observations suggest that common neural signatures of sleep may have emerged in the vertebrate brain over 450 million years ago.

Access optionsAccess options

Subscribe to Journal

Get full journal access for 1 year

227,81 €

only 4,47 € per issue

All prices include VAT for Netherlands.

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

Data availability

Data that support the findings of this study are available as Supplementary Information and Source Data. The supplementary videos are linked in the Supplementary Information and are available for downloading at https://drive.google.com/open?id=1CQGSFzxm39KCvN9D_XwJR2rOY6hS7oC5. Any other relevant data are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.

Code availability

Code for custom Viewpoint protocols, Arduino sketches, FIJI macros and MatLab programs are available from https://github.com/louiscleung.

References

  1. 1.

    Campbell, S. S. & Tobler, I. Animal sleep: a review of sleep duration across phylogeny. Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 8, 269–300 (1984).

  2. 2.

    Leung, L. C. & Mourrain, P. Sleep: short sleepers should keep count of their hypocretin neurons. Curr. Biol. 28, R558–R560 (2018).

  3. 3.

    Pieron, H. Le Probleme Physiologique su Sommeil (Masson, 1913).

  4. 4.

    Shein-Idelson, M., Ondracek, J. M., Liaw, H. P., Reiter, S. & Laurent, G. Slow waves, sharp waves, ripples, and REM in sleeping dragons. Science 352, 590–595 (2016).

  5. 5.

    Prober, D. A. et al. Hypocretin/orexin overexpression induces an insomnia-like phenotype in zebrafish. J. Neurosci. 26, 13400–13410 (2006).

  6. 6.

    Yokogawa, T. et al. Characterization of sleep in zebrafish and insomnia in hypocretin receptor mutants. PLoS Biol. 5, e277 (2007).

  7. 7.

    Zhdanova, I. V. Sleep in zebrafish. Zebrafish 3, 215–226 (2006).

  8. 8.

    Aho, V. et al. Homeostatic response to sleep/rest deprivation by constant water flow in larval zebrafish in both dark and light conditions. J. Sleep Res. 26, 394–400 (2017).

  9. 9.

    Appelbaum, L. et al. Sleep-wake regulation and hypocretin-melatonin interaction in zebrafish. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 106, 21942–21947 (2009).

  10. 10.

    Mueller, T., Dong, Z., Berberoglu, M. A. & Guo, S. The dorsal pallium in zebrafish, Danio rerio (Cyprinidae, Teleostei). Brain Res. 1381, 95–105 (2011).

  11. 11.

    Berman, J. R., Skariah, G., Maro, G. S., Mignot, E. & Mourrain, P. Characterization of two melanin-concentrating hormone genes in zebrafish reveals evolutionary and physiological links with the mammalian MCH system. J. Comp. Neurol. 517, 695–710 (2009).

  12. 12.

    Chen, T. W. et al. Ultrasensitive fluorescent proteins for imaging neuronal activity. Nature 499, 295–300 (2013).

  13. 13.

    Madelaine, R. et al. MicroRNA-9 couples brain neurogenesis and angiogenesis. Cell Reports 20, 1533–1542 (2017).

  14. 14.

    Chauvette, S., Crochet, S., Volgushev, M. & Timofeev, I. Properties of slow oscillation during slow-wave sleep and anesthesia in cats. J. Neurosci. 31, 14998–15008 (2011).

  15. 15.

    Borbély, A. A. A two process model of sleep regulation. Hum. Neurobiol. 1, 195–204 (1982).

  16. 16.

    Borbély, A. A., Daan, S., Wirz-Justice, A. & Deboer, T. The two-process model of sleep regulation: a reappraisal. J. Sleep Res. 25, 131–143 (2016).

  17. 17.

    Ikeda-Sagara, M. et al. Induction of prolonged, continuous slow-wave sleep by blocking cerebral H1 histamine receptors in rats. Br. J. Pharmacol. 165, 167–182 (2012).

  18. 18.

    Marzanatti, M., Monopoli, A., Trampus, M. & Ongini, E. Effects of nonsedating histamine H1-antagonists on EEG activity and behavior in the cat. Pharmacol. Biochem. Behav. 32, 861–866 (1989).

  19. 19.

    Saitou, K., Kaneko, Y., Sugimoto, Y., Chen, Z. & Kamei, C. Slow wave sleep-inducing effects of first generation H1-antagonists. Biol. Pharm. Bull. 22, 1079–1082 (1999).

  20. 20.

    Niethard, N. et al. Sleep-stage-specific regulation of cortical excitation and inhibition. Curr. Biol. 26, 2739–2749 (2016).

  21. 21.

    Dissel, S. et al. Sleep restores behavioral plasticity to Drosophila mutants. Curr. Biol. 25, 1270–1281 (2015).

  22. 22.

    Che Has, A. T. et al. Zolpidem is a potent stoichiometry-selective modulator of α1β3 GABAA receptors: evidence of a novel benzodiazepine site in the α1–α1 interface. Sci. Rep. 6, 28674 (2016).

  23. 23.

    Sitaram, N., Wyatt, R. J., Dawson, S. & Gillin, J. C. REM sleep induction by physostigmine infusion during sleep. Science 191, 1281–1283 (1976).

  24. 24.

    Callaway, C. W., Lydic, R., Baghdoyan, H. A. & Hobson, J. A. Pontogeniculooccipital waves: spontaneous visual system activity during rapid eye movement sleep. Cell. Mol. Neurobiol. 7, 105–149 (1987).

  25. 25.

    Datta, S. Cellular basis of pontine ponto-geniculo-occipital wave generation and modulation. Cell. Mol. Neurobiol. 17, 341–365 (1997).

  26. 26.

    Baghdoyan, H. A., Lydic, R., Callaway, C. W. & Hobson, J. A. The carbachol-induced enhancement of desynchronized sleep signs is dose dependent and antagonized by centrally administered atropine. Neuropsychopharmacology 2, 67–79 (1989).

  27. 27.

    Coleman, C. G., Lydic, R. & Baghdoyan, H. A. M2 muscarinic receptors in pontine reticular formation of C57BL/6J mouse contribute to rapid eye movement sleep generation. Neuroscience 126, 821–830 (2004).

  28. 28.

    Datta, S., Quattrochi, J. J. & Hobson, J. A. Effect of specific muscarinic M2 receptor antagonist on carbachol induced long-term REM sleep. Sleep 16, 8–14 (1993).

  29. 29.

    Árnason, B. B., Þorsteinsson, H. & Karlsson, K. A. E. Absence of rapid eye movements during sleep in adult zebrafish. Behav. Brain Res. 291, 189–194 (2015).

  30. 30.

    Roessmann, U., Velasco, M. E., Sindely, S. D. & Gambetti, P. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in ependymal cells during development. An immunocytochemical study. Brain Res. 200, 13–21 (1980).

  31. 31.

    Conductier, G. et al. Control of ventricular ciliary beating by the melanin concentrating hormone-expressing neurons of the lateral hypothalamus: a functional imaging survey. Front. Endocrinol. 4, 182 (2013).

  32. 32.

    Dale, N. Purinergic signaling in hypothalamic tanycytes: potential roles in chemosensing. Semin. Cell Dev. Biol. 22, 237–244 (2011).

  33. 33.

    Rizzoti, K. & Lovell-Badge, R. Pivotal role of median eminence tanycytes for hypothalamic function and neurogenesis. Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 445, 7–13 (2017).

  34. 34.

    Peyron, C., Sapin, E., Leger, L., Luppi, P. H. & Fort, P. Role of the melanin-concentrating hormone neuropeptide in sleep regulation. Peptides 30, 2052–2059 (2009).

  35. 35.

    Logan, D. W., Burn, S. F. & Jackson, I. J. Regulation of pigmentation in zebrafish melanophores. Pigment Cell Res. 19, 206–213 (2006).

  36. 36.

    Torterolo, P., Lagos, P., Sampogna, S. & Chase, M. H. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) immunoreactivity in non-neuronal cells within the raphe nuclei and subventricular region of the brainstem of the cat. Brain Res. 1210, 163–178 (2008).

  37. 37.

    Conductier, G. et al. Melanin-concentrating hormone regulates beat frequency of ependymal cilia and ventricular volume. Nat. Neurosci. 16, 845–847 (2013).

  38. 38.

    Hassani, O. K., Lee, M. G. & Jones, B. E. Melanin-concentrating hormone neurons discharge in a reciprocal manner to orexin neurons across the sleep–wake cycle. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 106, 2418–2422 (2009).

  39. 39.

    Jego, S. et al. Optogenetic identification of a rapid eye movement sleep modulatory circuit in the hypothalamus. Nat. Neurosci. 16, 1637–1643 (2013).

  40. 40.

    Kawauchi, H., Kawazoe, I., Tsubokawa, M., Kishida, M. & Baker, B. I. Characterization of melanin-concentrating hormone in chum salmon pituitaries. Nature 305, 321–323 (1983).

  41. 41.

    Kwan, K. M. et al. The Tol2kit: a multisite gateway-based construction kit for Tol2 transposon transgenesis constructs. Dev. Dyn. 236, 3088–3099 (2007).

  42. 42.

    Hieber, V., Dai, X., Foreman, M. & Goldman, D. Induction of α1-tubulin gene expression during development and regeneration of the fish central nervous system. J. Neurobiol. 37, 429–440 (1998).

  43. 43.

    Muto, A., Ohkura, M., Abe, G., Nakai, J. & Kawakami, K. Real-time visualization of neuronal activity during perception. Curr. Biol. 23, 307–311 (2013).

  44. 44.

    Bernardos, R. L. & Raymond, P. A. GFAP transgenic zebrafish. Gene Expr. Patterns 6, 1007–1013 (2006).

  45. 45.

    Tabor, K. M. et al. Direct activation of the Mauthner cell by electric field pulses drives ultrarapid escape responses. J. Neurophysiol. 112, 834–844 (2014).

  46. 46.

    Appelbaum, L. et al. Circadian and homeostatic regulation of structural synaptic plasticity in hypocretin neurons. Neuron 68, 87–98 (2010).

  47. 47.

    Renier, C. et al. Genomic and functional conservation of sedative-hypnotic targets in the zebrafish. Pharmacogenet. Genomics 17, 237–253 (2007).

  48. 48.

    Rihel, J. et al. Zebrafish behavioral profiling links drugs to biological targets and rest/wake regulation. Science 327, 348–351 (2010).

  49. 49.

    Pitrone, P. G. et al. OpenSPIM: an open-access light-sheet microscopy platform. Nat. Methods 10, 598–599 (2013).

Download references

Acknowledgements

We thank all members of the Mourrain laboratory for helpful feedback and discussion during the project and preparation of the manuscript; L. de Lecea, J. Zeitzer, C. Heller, D. Grahn, D. Colas and A. Adamantidis for important feedback; P. Raymond, K. Kwan and H. Burgess for sharing constructs and lines; S. Nishino for the kind gift of zolpidem; L. Alexandre and S. Murphy for their diligent care of our zebrafish; Stanford Cell Sciences Imaging Facility for imaging assistance (funded by NCRR award S10RR02557401); and J. Goldberg (Research To Prevent Blindness) and Stanford Vision Research Core (NIH P30-EY0268771). Funding support was provided by Stanford School of Medicine Dean’s fellowship (L.C.L.); JP18H04988, NBRP from AMED (K.K.); NIMH, NIDA, DARPA, NSF, Wiegers Family Fund, AE Foundation, Tarlton Foundation, and Gatsby Foundation (K.D.); NIMH, NINDS, Tashia and John Morgridge Fund (A.E.U.); and NIDDK (5R01DK090065-05), NINDS, NIMH, NIA, Bright-Focus Foundation, Simons Foundation and John Merck Fund (P.M.).

Reviewer information

Nature thanks Herwig Baier and the other anonymous reviewer(s) for their contribution to the peer review of this work.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

    • Louis C. Leung
    • , Gordon X. Wang
    • , Romain Madelaine
    • , Gemini Skariah
    •  & Philippe Mourrain
  2. Division of Molecular and Developmental Biology, National Institute of Genetics and Department of Genetics, Sokendai, Mishima, Japan

    • Koichi Kawakami
  3. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford, CA, USA

    • Karl Deisseroth
  4. Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

    • Karl Deisseroth
  5. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

    • Karl Deisseroth
  6. Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

    • Alexander E. Urban
  7. INSERM 1024, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France

    • Philippe Mourrain

Authors

  1. Search for Louis C. Leung in:

  2. Search for Gordon X. Wang in:

  3. Search for Romain Madelaine in:

  4. Search for Gemini Skariah in:

  5. Search for Koichi Kawakami in:

  6. Search for Karl Deisseroth in:

  7. Search for Alexander E. Urban in:

  8. Search for Philippe Mourrain in:

Contributions

L.C.L., G.X.W. and P.M. conceived the study. L.C.L. and P.M. designed experiments. L.C.L. and G.X.W. built the imaging platform and computing hardware. L.C.L., R.M., K.K. and G.S. performed cloning and generated transgenic lines and mutants. L.C.L. performed all experiments except for two-photon imaging (G.X.W.). L.C.L. and G.X.W. developed and wrote the computational pipeline. L.C.L. performed analysis and produced the figures. K.D. provided project mentorship. A.E.U. provided genome analysis and mentorship. L.C.L. and P.M. wrote the paper with contributions from all authors.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Philippe Mourrain.

Ethics declarations

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing interests.

Additional information

Publisher’s note: Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Extended data figures and tables

Extended Data Fig. 1 Sleep deprivation by the continuous-swim paradigm.

a, Left, evolutionary tree depicting current description of SWS and PS/REM sleep in amniotes. Right, schematic showing lateral view of major brain regions and neurochemistry that is implicated in sleep. Ob, olfactory bulbs; Am, amygdala; Hi, hippocampus; Te, telencephalon; Mi, midbrain; Cb, cerebellum; Md, medulla. b, Schematic showing the sleep deprivation (SD) setup (see Methods). c, d, Behavioural actimetry verifies that the sleep rebound induced by sleep deprivation causes decreasing wake and increasing sleep amounts as a function of number of days of sleep deprivation. Trial-averaged traces across 24 h after zebrafish were released following 1 day (n = 11, purple (c) or red (d)), 2 days (n = 11, blue (c) or orange (d)) or 3 days (n = 11, green (c) or yellow (d)) of sleep deprivation, against non-sleep-deprived sibling controls (n = 12, black). Mean activity is expressed as seconds of activity per 10-min bin (bold line) ± s.e.m. (shaded), per condition. Mean sleep amount is expressed as minutes of sleep per 10-min bin (bold) ± s.e.m. (shaded), per condition. The black triangle depicts the day-to-night transition, the white triangle depicts the night-to-day transition and the orange triangle shows the time of feeding. Red box in c indicates the equivalent time at which Ca2 imaging was conducted. e, Box plots showing the spread of total amounts of activity and sleep between non-sleep-deprived and sleep-deprived conditions, separated out by day and night. Blue lines denote median and black circles present the mean value for the group. *P f, Scatter plot of average ITI from desynchronized and synchronized brain activities. *P n = 10 fish per condition. g, Bar chart showing proportion of samples that displayed SBS within 2 h of release from non-sleep-deprived, 1-day, 2-day and 3-day sleep deprived conditions. Source data

Extended Data Fig. 2 Hypnotics produce distinct neural dynamics, including synchronous activity, travelling waves and broad silencing.

ae, Left, representative activity from 3-h recordings in which drugs were added after 1 h (red triangle) to freely swimming zebrafish. Activity traces are expressed as the number of seconds of activity per 10-min time bin, and plotted as mean (solid line) ± s.e.m. (shaded) per dose of promethazine (a, n = 24 fish), MS222 (b, n = 24 fish), gaboxadol (c, n = 24 fish), zolpidem (d, n = 24 fish) and eserine (e, n = 24 fish) from low to high doses (black Supplementary Table 1 for concentrations), showing the induction of dose-responsive behavioural sleep. Middle, representative time-aligned ΔF/F traces of 20 randomly selected dorsal pallium neurons (red triangle indicates the addition of drug after 10 min). Promethazine induced mild synchronization of dorsal pallium neurons, MS222 and gaboxadol induce total silencing, and zolpidem and eserine induced travelling waves. Right, neural signature across all time points represented by the first independent component (top) or replotted on two-dimensional phase space following PCA (bottom, grey lines and black lines depict wake versus sleep trajectories, respectively). See Supplementary Information for reproducibility information. Source data

supp-info-image = « // media.springernature.com/lw685/springer-static/esm/art:10.1038/s41586-019-1336-7/MediaObjects/41586_2019_1336_Fig7_ESM.jpg » data-track = « click » data-track-action = « afficher des informations supplémentaires » data-track-category = « corps de l’article » data-track-label = « lien » href = « http://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1336 -7 / figures / 7 « > Données étendues Fig. 3 fPSG de SBS et PWS. h3>

a b>, b b>, pallium dorsal signature de sillage ( a b>) par rapport à SBS ( b b>) avec traces Δ F i> / F i> alignées dans le temps masques choisis au hasard. Signature neuronale tracée dans un espace de phase bidimensionnel suivant une ACP. c b> – e b>, images éclairées par une feuille lumineuse illustrant une seule coupure z i> dans le cerveau et le muscle du tronc pendant la veille ( c b>) et pendant SBS ( d b>, e b>). Barre d’échelle, 100 μm. f b>, g b>, signature de sillage du pallium dorsal ( f b>) versus PWS ( g b>) avec Δ aligné dans le temps F i> / F i> traces des 20 masques représentés dans l’image de gauche. Indices de synchronicité avant et après l’onde PMT: ITI, 2,88 ± 2,14 s contre 2,96 ± 1,35 s, P i> = 0,792, test de Wilcoxon, n i> = 5 poisson; indice de cohérence, 1,32% ( n i> = 1 024 pics) contre 1,08% ( n i> = 1 065 pics); P i>> 0.05, i> 2 sup> test. Signature neuronale tracée dans un espace de phase bidimensionnel suivant une ACP. Barres d’échelle, 50 um. h b>, les sous-panneaux h1 à h6 montrent des images sélectionnées à partir d’une acquisition de volume fPSG typique de PWS dans laquelle les plans z i> ont été compressés dans une projection maximale. Les cadres décrivent les événements précédents jusqu’à la traversée de la vague PMT et à travers celle-ci. La flèche dans h1 indique une onde rostrocaudale musculaire; les flèches dans h2 indiquent l’activation coordonnée des cellules épendymaires; la flèche en h3 indique l’activation antérieure du cerveau postérieur; la flèche en h4 indique le début de l’onde; la flèche en h6 indique la propagation au pallium dorsal (voir Informations complémentaires pour une description détaillée). Barre d’échelle, 100 μm. Voir Informations supplémentaires pour des informations sur la reproductibilité.                            Données source                          p> div>

Données étendues Fig. 4 Analyse de la fréquence cardiaque. h3>

a b> – c b>, analyse de la fréquence cardiaque avant et après traitement au carbachol ( a b>) (* P i> t – i> test apparié des deux côtés, n i> = 4 poissons), traitement à la mépyramine ( b b>) ( * P i> t – i> test apparié bilatéral, n i> = 4 poissons) et avec ou sans privation de sommeil ( c b>) (* P i> t – i> de Student sur deux faces, n i> = 7 non privé de sommeil et 7 poisson privé de sommeil). d b> – f b>, histogrammes comparant la distribution de l’intervalle entre battements avant (barres noires) et après (barres rouges) le traitement au carbachol ( d b>) ou mépyramine ( e b>), et avec (barres rouges) ou sans (barres noires) privation de sommeil ( f b>). Trois histogrammes représentatifs sont présentés pour chaque condition. g b>, Images représentatives de la capture de la fréquence cardiaque montrant une contraction ventriculaire et le dessin d’un masque (rouge) pour mesurer les changements de fluorescence à partir du rythme cardiaque vert fluorescent. h b>, représentation graphique de la variation de la fluorescence mesurée par le masque, superposée au résultat de l’analyse de pic en cours (triangles rouges) à partir de laquelle la fréquence cardiaque et l’intervalle entre battements sont dérivés.                            Données source                          p> div>

Données étendues Fig. 5 Imagerie cérébrale avec hypnotiques supplémentaires. h3>

a b>, Imagerie sur un seul plan dans tout le cerveau d’un poisson zèbre stimulé par la prométhazine. La prométhazine induit une dynamique d’éclatement synchrone des deux côtés du pallium dorsal (barre rouge). A gauche, les masques utilisés pour extraire les traces transitoires de Ca 2 sup> indiquées dans le panneau du milieu. La dynamique est résumée par la PCA (à droite). b b>, Imagerie d’un seul plan dans tout le cerveau d’un poisson zèbre stimulé par l’ésérine. L’ésérine induit des ondes PMT. A gauche, les masques utilisés pour extraire les traces transitoires de Ca 2 sup> indiquées dans le panneau du milieu. La dynamique est résumée par la PCA (à droite). c b>, Imagerie dans un seul plan à l’échelle du cerveau d’un poisson-zèbre stimulé par carbachol préalablement incubé avec de la méthoctramine. La méthoctramine empêche l’induction par le carbachol de l’onde PMT. A gauche, les masques utilisés pour extraire les traces transitoires de Ca 2 sup> indiquées dans le panneau du milieu. La dynamique est résumée par la PCA (à droite). d b>, Imagerie sur un seul plan à l’échelle du cerveau d’un poisson zèbre stimulé par l’ésérine préalablement incubé avec de la méthoctramine. La méthoctramine empêche la dynamique du PMT induite par l’ésérine. A gauche, les masques utilisés pour extraire les traces transitoires de Ca 2 sup> indiquées dans le panneau du milieu. La dynamique est résumée par la PCA (à droite). e b>, Imagerie dans un seul plan à l’échelle du cerveau d’un poisson zèbre stimulé par le zolpidem. Le zolpidem a induit de multiples ondes PMT. A gauche, les masques utilisés pour extraire les traces transitoires de Ca 2 sup> indiquées dans le panneau du milieu. La dynamique est résumée par la PCA (à droite). Les triangles rouges indiquent le point auquel le médicament a été ajouté. f b>, PCA par décomposition en valeurs singulières de la signature fPSG PMT visible à la figure 3e . Des états stables distincts pour le sillage (lignes grises) et le sommeil PWS (lignes noires) peuvent être séparés, de même que les trajectoires marquées des ondes progressives des muscles et du cerveau (lignes bleues). Voir Informations supplémentaires pour des informations sur la reproductibilité. Barres d’échelle, 100 μm.                            Données source                          p> div>

Données étendues Fig. 6 L’activation des cellules épendymales est étroitement liée corrélée à l’onde PMT et peut être induite par le neuropeptide mélanine concentrant l’hormone. h3>

a b>, Vue dorsale d’une seule coupe à travers le tectum optique de Et (EP : poisson). Un encadré en pointillé indique l’emplacement le long de l’axe antéropostérieur. Barre d’échelle, 50 um. b b>, Coupez le tectum optique d’un poisson triple transgénique Et (EP: mCherry); Tg (α-tubuline: gal4; UAS: GFP). Flèches, cellules épendymales matures (magenta) co-exprimant l’α-tubuline (vert). c b>, Coupez à travers le tectum optique d’un poisson transgénique à 7 dpf Et (EP: mCherry); Tg (GFAP: gal4; UAS: GFP). Les cellules épendymales matures ne se chevauchent généralement pas avec les cellules GFAP-positives. d b> – g b>, les cellules ventriculaires activées avant l’onde PMT sont des cellules épendymales EP: mCherry positives. Coupure z i> confocale à travers un zPSG 7-dpf; EP: double poisson transgénique mCherry avant stimulation ( d b>), activation des cellules épendymales ( e b>) et onde PMT ( f b>). g b>, moyenne ± s.e.m. La trace Δ F i> / F i> de cinq cellules double positif sélectionnées de manière aléatoire, montrant l’activation transitoire de cellules épendymales avant l’onde PMT. Les flèches indiquent le temps à partir duquel les images affichées dans d b> – f b> sont prises. Barre d’échelle, 50 um. h b> – m b>, le peptide MCH induit l’activation des cellules épendymales. Projection maximale représentative par acquisition de volume SPIM avant ( h b>, j b>) et 5 min après l’injection intracérébroventriculaire avec le vecteur ( i b>) ou le peptide MCH ( k b>). l b>, Fluorescence moyenne normalisée entre les groupes porteur ( n i> = 9 poissons) et MCH ( n i> = 12 poissons) de la zone péritecto-ventriculaire (lignes pointillées ) avant et après l’injection. m b>, Diagramme en boîte des valeurs de changement de pourcentage de fluorescence normalisées entre groupes porteurs et groupes injectés avec MCH, le cercle noir représentant la moyenne. * P i> t i> -test de l’étudiant à deux faces. Barre d’échelle, 100 μm. n b>, la contraction du pigment est étroitement associée à des activations discrètes au cours de la dynamique de l’onde PMT. Cadres représentatifs sélectionnés à partir d’un seul z i> enregistrement d’un poisson zèbre pigmenté au cours d’une vague PMT; (1) sélection par code de couleur de tous les pigments couvrant le tectum optique en tant qu’échantillon représentatif; (2) pendant l’obscurité et l’activité de base, les pigments sont dispersés et couvrent une plus grande surface de pixels; (3, 4) les pigments se contractent avec l’activation des cellules épendymaires et l’onde PMT; (5) lorsque la vague s’atténue, les pigments se propagent. Barre d’échelle, 100 μm. o b>, Quantification de la surface en pixels tracée avec une couleur représentative du sous-panneau (1) dans n b> aux différents moments indiqués dans les sous-panneaux (1) à (5) dans n b>. * P i> n i> = 10 pigments. Voir Informations supplémentaires pour la description de la dynamique des pigments et la reproductibilité.                            Données source                          p> div>

Données étendues Fig. 7 Caractérisation de GFAP: epNTR et poissons transgéniques EP-mCherry. h3>

a b>, vue dorsale de la projection maximale d’un poisson-zèbre à 7-dpf (GFAP: epNTR-tagRFPT) utilisé pour ablater GFAP cellules positives. Barre d’échelle, 100 μm. b b>, Projection maximale d’un poisson-zèbre Et (EP: mCherry) 7-dpf exprimant mCherry dans des cellules épendymales putatives. Barre d’échelle, 50 um. c b>, Un seul z i> -lice du pallium dorsal de poisson Et (EP: mCherry). Cellules mCherry situées sur la surface ventriculaire du neuroépithélium télencéphalique et présentes dans la ligne médiane. Barre d’échelle, 50 um. d b>, un seul z i> -lice de parenchyme de tectum optique de poisson Et (EP: mCherry). Les cellules mCherry sont situées tout le long de la surface ventriculaire comprenant l’épendyme. Des processus longs et minces envahissent le parenchyme mésencéphalique, ce qui suggère la morphologie des cellules gliales non neuronales et (en particulier) le type spécialisé de cellules épendymales, les tanycytes. e b>, un seul z i> -lice du cerveau postérieur de poisson Et (EP: mCherry). Les cellules mCherry sont situées tout au long de la surface ventriculaire médiane, représentant l’épendyme s’étendant jusqu’au canal central de la moelle épinière. Les processus longs et minces suggèrent la morphologie des cellules non neuronales. f b>, g b>, l’actimétrie indique que les poissons ayant subi une ablation par GFAP sont irréversiblement immobiles sans reprise d’activité pendant la journée. L’activité moyenne est exprimée en secondes d’activité par bin de 10 minutes (gras) ± s.e.m. (ombré), par condition. La quantité moyenne de sommeil est exprimée en minutes de sommeil par tranche de 10 minutes (gras) ± s.e.m. (ombré), par condition. Le triangle noir représente la transition du jour au soir, le triangle blanc la transition de la nuit au jour et le triangle orange indique l’heure de l’alimentation. Diagrammes en boîte montrant l’activité totale et le sommeil pour les témoins frères par rapport à la larve à GFAP-ablated cell. La ligne bleue indique la médiane et les cercles noirs indiquent la valeur moyenne ( g b>). * P i> t i> bilatéral, n i> = 18 contrôle fraternel et 18 GFAP: epNTR prélevés dans deux expériences indépendantes. h b>, photographie à un grossissement de 4 × d’un poisson zèbre retenu à 7 dpf recevant une injection intracérébroventriculaire d’une solution de MCH avec une solution de rouge de phénol (couleur rouge pâle sur la photo). Le ventricule est légèrement dilaté à la suite de l’injection. Barre d’échelle, 500 µm. i b>, j b>, L’actimétrie comportementale montre que les larves injectées par MCH sont moins mobiles et dorment davantage le premier jour et la première nuit après l’injection, mais se rétablissent surtout le deuxième jour. Diagrammes en boîte montrant l’activité totale et le sommeil pour les larves de porteurs par rapport aux injections de MCH. La ligne bleue indique la médiane et les astérisques noirs indiquent la valeur moyenne ( j b>). P i>> 0,05, test t i> de Student sur deux faces, n i> = 6 poissons injectés et 6 MCH injectés.                            Données source                          p> div>

Données étendues Fig. 8 Caractérisation de MCH: epNTR , H6408 et doubles mutants mchr1a mchr1b i>. h3>

a b>, Schéma de l’emplacement des cellules MCH-positives dans l’hypothalamus latéral du patient larves de poisson zèbre. b b>, la projection maximale confocale montre les cellules MCH du poisson transgénique Tg (-5kbMMCH: epNTR-tagRFPT) avant traitement avec l’agent d’ablation métronidazole (MTZ). On observe un faible signal de projection à l’hypophyse (région pointillée et astérisque). Barre d’échelle, 50 um. c b>, les cellules MCH sont éliminées dans la larve Tg (-5kbMMCH: epNTR-tagRFPT) traitée au métronidazole. d b> – f b>, la larve colorée Tg (-5kbMM: epNTR-tagRFPT) marquée à l’anticorps MCH présente une localisation hypothalamique latérale et une projection vers l’hypophyse ( d b >) (vert) colocalisant avec l’expression de tagRFP-T ( e b>, magenta; f b>, blanc). g b>, alignement de la séquence de la protéine MCHR1a de type sauvage et de la protéine mutante tronquée prédite résultant de la suppression du CRISPR. h b>, Confirmation par séquençage de la perte de la séquence TATG de l’exon 2 du gène mchr1a i> provenant du génotypage du mutant homozygote MCHR1a. i b>, alignement de la séquence de la protéine MCHR1b de type sauvage et de la protéine mutante prédite tronquée résultant du mutant TILLING avec un codon d’arrêt précoce. j b>, Confirmation par séquençage de la substitution TGG en TGA de l’exon 1 du gène mchr1b i> provenant du génotypage du mutant homozygote MCHR1b. k b> – m b>, les poissons traités par un antagoniste de MCHR (H6408) présentent une activité accrue et perturbent le début de la dynamique des cellules épendymaires et des ondes PMT. k b>, En haut, chronologie de l’expérience et addition d’agents pharmacologiques au cours de l’expérience d’imagerie sur 2 h Ca 2 sup> (le triangle rouge indique l’addition de carbachol). En bas, proportion d’activation des cellules épendymales (cercle ouvert) et / ou de l’onde PMT (cercle plein), observée lors de la session d’imagerie entre le contrôle de la porteuse ( n i> = 8 poissons) et H6408 ( n i> = 7 poissons) est tracé en fonction de la latence moyenne à l’activation (en min) ± sem * P i> i> 2 sup>. l b>, En haut, actimétrie du poisson zèbre de type sauvage ( n i> = 20) traité avec porteur / antagoniste de MCHR (H6408; n i> = 20) dans Bacs de 10 min sur une période de 24 h, indiquant le nombre moyen de secondes d’activité par bac (gras) ± sem (ombré). En bas, sommeil représenté en minutes de sommeil par tranche de 10 minutes (en gras) ± jusqu’à s.e.m. sur une période de 24 heures. Le triangle noir représente la transition du jour au soir, le triangle blanc la transition de la nuit au jour et le triangle orange indique l’heure de l’alimentation. m b>, Des graphiques en boîtes illustrant la répartition des activités totales et du sommeil entre les groupes stimulés par le porteur (E3) et les groupes traités par H6408, séparés le jour et la nuit. Les lignes bleues indiquent la médiane et les cercles noirs indiquent la valeur moyenne. * P i> t i> bilatéral. Voir Informations supplémentaires pour des informations sur la reproductibilité.                            Données source                          p> div>

Données étendues Fig. 9 Comparaison fPSG du SBS induit chez les poissons non-privés de sommeil et privés de sommeil. h3>

a b>, b b>, enregistrement fPSG représentatif des personnes privées de sommeil ( a b>) et du poisson zèbre privé de sommeil ( b b>) au cours de la phase nocturne normale. Traces d’activité de fEOG (haut), fEEG (milieu) et fEMG (milieu). fEEG et fEMG sont des traces Δ F i> / F i> de 14 masques couvrant de larges régions du cerveau (telles que marquées), avec intégration de l’activité neuronale dans des cellules 1-s. La fréquence cardiaque a été mesurée immédiatement avant l’imagerie et la distribution de l’intervalle entre les battements est montrée avec le coefficient de variation (CoV) (en bas). Un éclatement synchrone transitoire a été détecté (boîtes rouges par exemple) entre des contractions musculaires peu fréquentes et des événements d’excitation cérébrale générale. Voir Informations supplémentaires pour des informations sur la reproductibilité.                            Données source                          p> div>

Données étendues Fig. 10 SPIM de maintien de veille les larves révèlent les signatures SBS et PWS pendant la nuit normale. h3>

a b>, Schéma d’un appareil de maintenance de sillage adoptant un stimulus mécano-acoustique aléatoire pendant la phase de jour pour consolider le sillage, et ainsi dormir dans la phase de nuit pour l’imagerie. b b>, actimétrie représentative des poissons zèbres de type sauvage non traités avec le stimulus ( n i> = 12 poissons) avec actimétrie de poissons de type sauvage traités avec le stimulus ( n i> = 12 poissons) dans des bacs de 10 min sur une période de 24 h, indiquant le nombre moyen de secondes d’activité par bac (gras) ± sem (ombré). En bas, sommeil représenté en minutes de sommeil par tranche de 10 minutes (en gras) ± jusqu’à s.e.m. (ombré) sur une période de 24 heures. Le triangle noir représente la transition du jour au soir, le triangle blanc la transition de la nuit au jour et le triangle orange indique l’heure de l’alimentation. c b>, d b>, enregistrement fPSG de SBS ( c b>) et de PWS ( d b>) pendant la phase de nuit normale. La boîte rouge montre une synchronie transitoire dans le pallium dorsal, indicateur de SBS. Traces d’activité de fEOG (en haut), fEEG (au milieu) et fEMG (en bas). fEEG et fEMG sont des traces Δ F i> / F i> de 14 masques couvrant de larges régions du cerveau (telles que marquées), avec intégration de l’activité neuronale dans des cellules 1-s. Voir Informations supplémentaires pour des informations sur la reproductibilité.                            Données source                          p> div>

Données étendues Fig. 11 L’imagerie SPIM révèle un SBS spontané et PWS pendant la phase de nuit. h3>

a b>, Schéma du protocole de simulation du montage par opposition à l’extension du traitement sur agarose étendu pendant 1 à 3 jours pour tester le degré de stimulation de l’éveil résultant de retenue d’agarose. b b>, l’actimétrie comportementale montre que, bien que les animaux initialement montés sur l’agarose manifestent un comportement de sommeil lors de leur remise en liberté, les cycles veille-sommeil redeviennent normaux; cela indique que la contention à long terme n’est pas traumatisante ou mortelle pour les larves de poisson zèbre. Actimétrie du poisson-zèbre de type sauvage monté de façon factice ( n i> = 36 poissons) par rapport à ( n i> = 31 poissons), dans des poubelles de 10 min sur une période de 24 h nombre moyen de secondes d’activité par bac (gras) ± sem (ombré). En bas, sommeil représenté en minutes de sommeil par tranche de 10 minutes (en gras) ± jusqu’à s.e.m. (ombré), sur une période de 24 h. Les triangles noirs illustrent la transition de jour en soir, les triangles blancs décrivent la transition de nuit et le triangle orange indique l’heure de l’alimentation. c b>, d b>, enregistrement fPSG de SBS ( c b>) et de PWS ( d b>) pendant la phase de nuit normale. La boîte rouge montre une synchronie transitoire dans le pallium dorsal, signe de SBS entre contractions musculaires. Traces d’activité de fEOG (en haut), fEEG (au milieu) et fEMG (en bas). fEEG et fEMG sont des traces Δ F i> / F i> de 14 masques couvrant de larges régions du cerveau (telles que marquées), avec intégration de l’activité neuronale dans des cellules 1-s. Voir Informations supplémentaires pour des informations sur la reproductibilité.                            Données source                          p> div> div> div> section>

Informations supplémentaires h2>

                                                                         

Informations supplémentaires h3>

Ce fichier contient du texte supplémentaire; qui inclut les figures supplémentaires 1 et 2 et les tableaux supplémentaires 1 et 2. Vous trouverez plus de détails sur ce fichier dans le Guide des informations supplémentaires. p> div>

Informations supplémentaires

Ce fichier contient le Guide d’informations supplémentaires. Il contient plus de détails sur le texte supplémentaire et inclut également les liens vers les vidéos supplémentaires 1 à 19 et les légendes vidéo, qui peuvent également être téléchargés à partir de https://drive.google.com/open?id=1CQGSFzxm39KCvN9D_XwJR2rOY6hS7oC5.

div> div> div> section>

section>

section>

À propos de cet article h2>

Maîtrise de la langue img> div> div> div> div> section>                                                                               

Commentaires h2>

En soumettant un commentaire, vous acceptez de respecter par nos Conditions et Règles de la communauté . Si vous trouvez quelque chose d’abus ou qui n’est pas conforme à nos termes ou directives, veuillez le signaler comme étant inapproprié. P> div> section>                                                                                span>                      div>


Huile de CBD peut aider avec troubles de sommeil. Visite HuileCBD.be h3>


div>
Lire la suite